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Weekly Roundups

Boeing, Viva Aerobus in the Spotlight: The Week in Aerospace

By Antonio Gozain | Wed, 07/13/2022 - 16:19

Viva Aerobus will postpone the start of operations of selected routes involving the Toluca International Airport (AIT) and the Felipe Ángeles International Airport (AIFA) due to a delay in the delivery of nine new Airbus aircraft, informed the airline. The French planemaker has seen problems within its supply chain, including components from key suppliers such as Pratt & Whitney.

The low-cost airline explained that the new four routes from AIFA to Puerto Escondido, Acapulco, Oaxaca and Havana will be affected from July 15, 2022 to the first weeks of September. Meanwhile, in the AIT, the restart of Viva Aerobus’s routes to Monterrey and Cancun will be delayed for two and a half months, until Sept. 23, 2022. In addition, the new route to Merida will be postponed for 14 days.

 

Buckle Up! This is the Week in Aerospace!

 

With the Rise of Fuel Prices, are Cheap Flights Coming to an End?

Cheap flights have been one of the main supports for the aviation industry since the start of COVID-19 quarantines, which continue disrupting the sector. But those flights are only viable when fuel prices remain within a limited range. As fuel prices rise, low-cost airlines might have to increase their prices, leaving behind the disruptive “cheap flight” model.

“We must take actions that will allow us to make profits at a time when prices in the industry have no ceiling,” said Michael O’Leary, Chief Executive, Ryanair, the Irish airline known for its low-cost flights in the EU. The increase in fuel prices over the past months, coupled with environmental charges and the UK’s exit from the EU (Brexit), has led airlines in the EU to increase their tariffs. Fares are expected to be between 7 percent and 9 percent higher than in the summer of 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Read the full article here.

Boeing Deliveries Reach Highest Monthly Level since March 2019

Boeing delivered 51 airplanes in June 2022 to bring its 1H22 to 216 jets, a 38 percent increase compared with 1H21. June's deliveries exceeded the 50 threshold for the first time since March 2019 and included 43 Boeing 737 Max, which is recovering from a nearly two-year safety crisis, according to new company data, reported Reuters.

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Antonio Gozain Antonio Gozain Journalist and Industry Analyst