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Weekly Roundups

Mexico Enters Phase 3 of Contagion

By Miriam Bello | Thu, 04/23/2020 - 19:49

One week more means a week less on this COVID-19 fight. It seems like the whole world is settling under these new living conditions and that science is working at full capacity to find a cure.  Mexico is now on phase three of contagion, which will require a much more serious attitude to get through this crisis as safely as possible.

Thanks to our health professionals, medical staff and scientists, humanity will not lose hope during this critical time. 

Are you ready for your news fix? Here’s the week in health!

NATIONAL

Respect should be the number one thing that comes to mind when treating a medical professional while there is a global pandemic going on. On Monday, during the daily COVID-19 updates that the Ministry of Health offers, Fabiana Zepeda, Head of the Nursing program division at IMSS made a call for respect and a cease of aggressions against medical staff as they are “people leaving their homes, families and lives at medical facilities.”

President López Obrador has shown no intention to releasing support programs for companies and workers. Mexico is the only country, from the G20 and OECD to show indifference to these groups. Instead, López Obrador has announced that in order to improve the government’s austerity plans, he will eliminate at least 10 under secretariats to be able to prioritize the Dos Bocas refinery or the Santa Lucia airport. Will the unemployment that this elimination of these dependencies be the most effective way to combat an economic crisis? We will soon see.

Mexican scientists have published an analysis that reveals the complete genomic of 7 virus that integrate COVID-19. This finding is key to keep track of the evolution and resistance of the virus to eradicate it.

In Mexico, one of every two infected patients suffer from a chronic condition. Half of our population will potentially face complications with the virus, as chronic diseases make one a vulnerable patient.

In Mexico City there are 570 patients connected to a ventilator, while there are other 1,362 patients hospitalized. According to Governor Claudia Sheinbaum, this takes up around 35 percent of the capacity of the city hospitals. Seven hospitals of the capital have declared they have reached their maximum capacity of beds and ventilators to keep receiving patients with COVID-19.

INTERNATIONAL

Roche pharmaceutical announced the launch of a serology test to find antibodies of patients to determine their exposure to COVID-19. Learn more about diagnosis test here

The FDA has allowed the medical devices company LivaNova to modify its cardiopulmonary products for “extended use in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) therapy longer than six hours to address COVID-19.”

Women are also one of the most vulnerable groups of this pandemic. Health threats are not necessarily endangering women more than gender violence, however. The UN has exposed that distress calls have tripled since isolation measured started. Read more about women during this pandemic and on future global developments here

In Italy, signs of COVID-19 on water have been found. However, this does not endanger the population as “the integrated water cycle, the process that leads to the purification of water in the sewage and treatment system, is certainly safe.”

Oxford University has successfully found a potential vaccine for COVID-19 during their clinical trials. This study is about to begin human trials with 551 people.

In the US, President Donald Trump has signed a presidential order forbidding migration with the intention of “protecting local workers” during this COVID-19 crisis.

Also, American citizens have protested due to the isolation measures imposed by the government to contain the further spread of the virus.

Canada has prolonged the temporary closing of its border with the US for another month to avoid contagion of COVID-19.

Novartis has recently purchased the startup Amblyotech, which has been working on a digital treatment for “lazy eye” that can sometimes end up on loss of sight on children and adults.

Photo by:   pxhere
Miriam Bello Miriam Bello Journalist and Industry Analyst