HÉCTOR TIJERINA
Sales Director of SELCI
/
View from the Top

Mexico Will Not Manage Without Innovation

Fri, 03/08/2019 - 11:35

Q: What are the main benefits and added value your company provides compared to other equipment providers?
A: We participate in industries like pharma, chemicals and food and beverages, offering an integral solution that includes the technology from the different firms we represent. All our equipment partners are global leaders in their own area. In addition to having a team with a high level of expertise, we also try to provide equipment and services at a good price and with a strong aftersales approach. Although we may not be the largest equipment distributor in Mexico, we have a significant presence in the field of analytics through the Japanese brand HORIBA, which has 70 years of experience in the market.
HORIBA is the world’s third-largest company focused on analytics equipment and has trademark technologies for identifying and characterizing particle sizes through methods like laser dispersion. Particle size is important in many industrial processes because it reveals the properties of a substance and how it will aggregate or react. HORIBA’s technology can test particles regardless of their state, whether solid, emulsified or any other.
Q: How does SELCI manage its sales strategy and what are your growth plans regarding sales and distribution?
A: We work with laboratory directors, scientists involved in research and quality control and technology directors. On average, our clients are medium-sized companies with budgets of US$100,000 per piece of equipment. Although we are based in Guadalajara, our clients are spread across the country. We operate through sales representatives and sub-distributors but we are already looking at Mexico City as our next office destination. We are focusing on increasing our presence there, but it is not easy. The macroeconomic climate does not favor large investments at the moment and we need to find specialized people who know our products.
Q: What opportunities do you see for Mexico to advance as a technology and innovation hub?
A: Over the past 25 years, technology development has blossomed in Mexico. However, there is still a lack of awareness regarding the implementation and enforcement of manufacturing regulations, both in terms of quality and ethics. When new products are developed without proper standards or quality controls, companies simply choose not to adhere to nonmandatory constraints.  
The central issue is education, ranging from traditional education to raising awareness on how technological and scientific innovations advance. There should be a focus on boosting research and innovation toward patented products from a private and public standpoint, lest we want to remain dependent on our relationship with other countries for years to come. Mexico is simply not going to manage without innovation and its own patents. Countries like Korea have developed an investment strategy focused on R&D and now they are important players in this area.
Q: What are your main priorities for 2019?
A: We want to consolidate another year of contracts, to fulfill the expectations of our providers and to potentially open a new office in Mexico City. There are hindering factors that could impact the development of our operations, including the dollar-peso exchange rate, the political climate between Mexico and the US and changes in incentive packages and tax schemes in both countries. However, we will continue looking for new opportunities.