Sergio Almazán
President
AIMMGM
/
View from the Top

Uniting the Mining Industry

Wed, 02/09/2022 - 12:00

Q: What were the main challenges for the mining industry in 2021?

A: The pandemic was a remarkable challenge, both worldwide and in Mexico. Fortunately, our operations did not stop as they did in 2020, when they were paused for almost two months. In 2021, the main challenges remained the pandemic alongside new policies from the federal administration.

Q: How much interest are companies showing in exploring Mexico’s geological potential?

A: Unfortunately, mining exploration has been a problem. There have been no new concessions and this has impacted investment in mining exploration, which has decreased by 60 percent from 2014 to 2020. The entire mining sector must work together with the authorities to promote mining exploration in the country. 

Q: What is AIMMGM’s role in building stronger private and public relationships?

A: AIMMGM has always been an important organization, counting on expert knowledge to deal with mining’s most pressing topics through engagement with the state and federal government. With the technical and scientific expertise available to us, we can develop the best mining practices in Mexico. 

Q: What role does AIMMGM play in the development of talent within the industry?

A: This is one of AIMMGM’s main objectives. Our goal is to continue gathering experts on different mining topics. We have recently included more topics due to the global integration of the metallurgical mining sector. AIMMGM continues to train experts who have a greater knowledge of mining operations.

Q: How likely is it for Mexico to become globally competitive in terms of lithium production?

A: Mexico is a country with great opportunities in the mining industry. Seventy percent of the territory is categorized as likely to contain mineral deposits equal to or greater than those already discovered. Mexico has always been considered a country with great mineral resource potential.

Regarding lithium, we must recognize that the knowledge we have about this highly in-demand metal is not enough. In Mexico, the indicators of lithium’s potential are still insufficient. We do have some anomalies that are worth exploring in greater detail. Nevertheless, we cannot say that Mexico today has great lithium potential. Mexico has around 1 percent of the global lithium reserves and it is too soon to have serious conversations regarding it.

Q: What is the best way to handle the misunderstandings surrounding the mining sector and its impact on Mexico?

A: There must be effective communication about how mining is done in Mexico, including good practices and offering hard data that proves the work that has been done in the sector. Our main job is to introduce reliably-sourced information on how modern mining operates in Mexico. It is a big challenge due to the polarization of information and fake news that misrepresents the industry.

 

Mexico’s Association of Mining Engineers, Metallurgists and Geologists (AIMMGM) is one of the main promoters of mining’s positive image and the main entity that influences decisions in the mining sector for the benefit of the country.