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News Article

Value Creation Practices for a New Workforce

Wed, 04/25/2018 - 13:57

The workforce in today’s companies is composed of different professional profiles and generations, creating the need to find the best practices to manage differences and diversity, panelists at Mexico Talent Forum 2018 told the audience on Wednesday at the Hotel Sheraton Maria Isabel in Mexico City.

Jaime Cardoso, Marketing Director at Kronos Latin America and moderator of the panel “Value Creation Practices for a New Workforce,” said that HR departments face the challenge of recruiting the best talent while at the same time creating an environment that meets the various needs of a diverse workforce. Added Paola Carranco, Founder Director and Consultant at Talent Lab: “As companies, we need to create a bigger sense of community and communicate to our employees what their purpose is, why they are valuable and why they do what they do. This is the key to being more productive and being a better performer.”

The way employees and the company communicate is vital to improving engagement and the performance of both. At Grupo Posadas, there are 17,000 collaborators with different generational needs, expectations, benefits and perspectives, said Diana Salinas, Director of Human Capital at the group. “Leaders and HR departments must create custom solutions that integrate everyone and which motivate them to be part of the company,” she said. According to Miriam Dávila, Learning Manager for Latin America at WeWork, “the way a company involves their employees and leaders guide their teams is key to performance because it impacts directly on engagement, cultural organization and commitment to the company.

Cardoso said generational changes not only result in differences regarding the needs of the workforce but also in access to technology and the skills each individual has to perform a job. As a result, companies face the challenge of recruiting better and according to their needs and expectations. Uber is among the companies facing these challenges. “At Uber, we need people who know how to learn and develop with our company because it is key to our performance to have professionals who join us in all our processes and values,” said Jonathan Reyes, Head of Recruitment for Latin America at Uber. WeWork’s Dávila concurred, adding that it was also up to a company’s management to show the way. “CEOs and leaders must act as ambassadors of the brand to guide employees through changes and to involve them in the purpose of the company in an authentic way,” she said.

Another challenge in Mexico is the contradictory perception between working times and productivity, said Cardoso. Companies must work to redefine how they measure productivity beyond the hours of work because generations like millennials need less time to be more productive. United Nations Mexico implements a system of performance evaluation for their employees that allows them to measure their own productivity according to the bigger goal. “We create an environment of respect for our employees, wherein they are aware of the flexibility to be with us but also the commitment to the UN,” Gustavo Linares, Director General of Human Resources at UN Development Program, said.

Overall, companies face the challenge of introducing a better work-life balance for their employees and to create more engagement, said Cardoso. “We have to understand that flexibility means different things for different people, so we have to be aware of the need of our employees to provide them with the environment and the motivation to work for us,” added Reyes. Carranco echoed those comments and pointed to the particularities of Mexico City. In a place like Mexico City, she said, “we need to be aware that people need flexibility because of the conditions in which we live here, such as traffic. We need to train our leaders to manage this flexibility to ensure the best performance for all. If we want things to change, we need to do things differently and transform our business and how we manage.”